Every Model. Every Year

Ford Mustang Engines by Year

Research all the Mustang engines available for every model year. We have collected and organized every Mustang year and engine option below. 

Every Mustang Engine for Every Generation & Model Year

At MustangSpecs our mission is to provide as much Ford Mustang data, stats and general information as possible. We try our best to make sure our information is plentiful and free because we want to help Mustang fans around the world get the data they need quickly and easily in order to make informed buying decisions. One thing we get asked all the time is to organize all the Mustang engine options by generation and year. 

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First generation (1965–1973)

1st Generation Ford Mustang Engine Options

A diverse group of engines were available for the first generation icon

1st Generation Ford Mustang Engine

The first generation of Mustang launched halfway through April of 1964 and even by 1965 there were significant differences in the engines that were available. For instance, even though you could get a six-cylinder engine in 1964 or 1965, they were two very different engines, with different displacements, horsepower and torque ratings, and hardware. Most years had at least four options: A six-cylinder that served as the base, a two-barrel carburetor V8, a four-barrel carburetor V8, and a high-performance four-barrel carburetor V8. Many of the packages that we consider especially collectible now, like the California Special or GT package, required one of the two V8s that came with a four-barrel carburetor. Some engines were only available for a single year, this was partially because Ford was in the middle of some large changes and partially because if an option wasn’t particularly popular it got pulled before the next year. New car sales were significantly more focused on customization and options than they are today, and subsequently the engine options expanded to keep up with customer demands and special editions. 


1964 Engines

170 Cubic inch engine was only used on the early 1965 Mustangs, (often referred to as 1964 1/2). The engine code was “U”. Paint color was black (paint code 903) and... Learn more

1965 Engines

There were four engines offered in 1965. There was the 170 cubic inch inline six, the 289 Windsor V8, the 206 cubic inch V8 and the 200 cubic inch Thriftpower six cylinder... Learn more

1966 Engines

There were two engines for 1966. The standard engine was the 200 cubic inch Thriftpower V6. The option engine was the 289 Windsor V8, available with either a 2 or 4 barrel... Learn more

1967 Engines

There were three engines for 1967. Both the 200 Thriftpower V6 and optional 289 Windsor V8 made a comeback. There was also a big 390 cubic inch V8 with 320 hp... Learn more

1968 Engines

A whopping six engines were available in 1968. The additions were 302 Windsor V8 and the 427 FE Hipo as well as the 428 Cobra Jet.The Hipo V8 was only ever used in 1968... Learn more

1969 Engines

Try eight (that's right) engines being available in 1969. New engines included the 429 Boss V8, the 351 Windsor and 351 Cleveland V8, available as options or in special... Learn more

1970 Engines

Seven engines were available in 1970. The highlight was the 429 Boss with its 370 horsepower an thanks to aluminum heads with extremely large free flowing ports and other... Learn more

1971 Engines

Five engines were available in 1971. The 302 cubic inch engine was introduced in 1968 to the Mustang and continued to be offered in 1970 and then again in 1971, marketed ... Learn more

1972 Engines

Only three engines were available in 1972. The 302 cubic inch Windsor V8 engine continued to be available. All HO, Boss, CJ and 1972 – 73 engines use four bolt mains... Learn more

1973 Engines

Four engines were offered in 1973. The inline six jumped to 250 cubic inches but was otherwise the same as before. In terms of V8s, the 351 Windsor, 351 Cleveland and 302... Learn more

Second generation (1974–1978)

2nd Generation Ford Mustang Engine Options

2nd Generation Ford Mustang Engine

In 1974 due to the Federal government’s rules driven by an oil shortage, Ford no longer offered the V8 powerhouse in the Mustang. However, for reasons unknown to consumers an anemic 302 was offered again in 1975 through 1978. This is perhaps the least interesting and fun era when it comes to Mustang engine options. 

1974 Engines

The 140 ci engine was used from 1974 to 1979, it was then renamed a 2.3 liter engine and was used from 1979 to 1993. First used in the Mustang II in 1974 to 1978... Learn more

1975 Engines

Three engines were offered in 1975.The Lima Inline 4 was back as was the 171 Cologne V6. A new engine was offered also, an anemic 302 was offered again in 1975... Learn more

1976 Engines

Three engines were offered in 1976, the sames as 1975. All three engines are average at best and hardly rank in our of our best of Mustang lists. A time to forget for sure... Learn more

1977 Engines

When you ordered a base Mustang it always got the 2.3 liter or 140 cubic inch engine. One could upgrade from that point, though even the best upgrade was meager... Learn more

1978 Engines

When you ordered a base Mustang it always got the 2.3 liter or 140 cubic inch engine. One could upgrade from that point, though even the best upgrade was meager... Learn more

Third generation (1979–1993)

3rd Generation Ford Mustang Engine Options

3rd Generation Ford Mustang Engine

A total of seven different engines and variants were used during the third generation Mustang production years. The smallest was an 86 horsepower inline four, followed by a turbocharged version of the same engine that was used in the SVO and it was nearly as powerful as the V8. The 3.8 liter Essex V6 came into the picture during the 3rd generation Mustang to carry some load while at the top end of the engine ranks was the 302 small block V8 which was marketed as a 5 liter (closer to 4.9 liters actually). Following the second oil crisis in 1979, the 302 cu in (4.9 L) "5.0" engine was dropped in favor of a new 255 cu in (4.2 L) V8 due to its better fuel economy. The 255 was the only V8 offered in 1980 and 1981 and it was basically a sleeved-down 302 with only 120 hp, a poor option frankly. 

1979 Engines

Engine offerings included a 2.3L four-cylinder engine, a 2.3L engine with turbo, a 2.8L V-6, a 3.3L inline-6, and a 5.0L V-8. In all, the ’79 Mustang was more European looking.... Learn more

1980 Engines

Ford dropped the 302 V8 in 1980 from the lineup. In its place they offered a 255-cubic inch V8 which produced close to 119 hp. Also replaced the 2.8L V6 with a 3.3L inline six... Learn more

1981 Engines

New emissions standards resulted in engine changes in the 1981. The 2.3L was removed from the lineup. The 255 V8 engine was redesigned to produce approximately 115 hp... Learn more

1982 Engines

In addition to the return of the Mustang GT, Ford once again offered the 5.0L V-8 engine, which was capable of producing 157 hp this time around. Ford finally gave us power... Learn more

1983 Engines

1983 saw saw an increase in power from the Mustang GT’s 5.0L V8 engine, which was capable of producing 175 hp. There were only two engines available this model year... Learn more

1984 Engines

Welcome to the SVO and its turbocharged 2.3L inline-four-cylinder engine. It had 175 hp and 210 lb/ft of torque. The other two engines continued to be the 302... Learn more

1985 Engines

In an effort to improve upon its engine lineup, Ford introduced a 5.0L high output (HO) motor in 1985. Mustang modified the SVO slightly and released 439 additional SVOs... Learn more

1986 Engines

The Mustang said goodbye to the carburetor in 1986 when Ford introduced the first sequential multi-port fuel injection V8 engine. This 302-cubic inch V8 was... Learn more

1987 Engines

The 5.0L V8 engine now had 225 hp. While the V8 engine increased in power, the V6 engine was no longer an offering. Choices were a V8 or new 2.3L four-cylinder motor... Learn more

1988 Engines

In addition, California Mustang GTs featured a new mass airflow sensor instead of the older speed density system featured in previous models. There were few noticeable changes... Learn more

1989 Engines

Two engines were offered in 1989, a 5 liter high output Ford small block V8 or a 2.3 liter inline four. In 1989, all Mustangs featured a new mass air system. Nothing else changed... Learn more

1990 Engines

Two engines were offered in 1990, a 5 liter high output Ford small block V8 or a 2.3 liter inline four. In 1990, all Mustangs featured a new mass air system. Nothing else changed... Learn more

1991 Engines

In 1991, Ford increased the horsepower of the base Mustang by offering an improved 105 hp twin-plug 2.3L four-cylinder engine with a distributorless ignition. Two engines... Learn more

1992 Engines

In 1992 Ford released a limited edition Mustang. The LX featured Ford’s 5.0L V-8 engine in a scaled down body style. The engines were the same otherwise... Learn more

1993 Engines

Ford’s Special Vehicle Team made headlines again in 1993 when Ford introduced the limited-production SVT Mustang Cobra. A Cobra R version was also created. Cobra R... Learn more

Fourth generation (1994–2004)

4th Generation Ford Mustang Engine Options

4th Generation Ford Mustang Engine

The fourth generation Mustang saw a lot of changes when it came to powertrain and engines. Initially Ford offered two engine options, the 3.8 liter V6 and trusty 5L V8. The 5 liter was slowly replaced by the modular 4.6L V8 in 1996 and that powered the top models for most of the rest of the fourth generation.

1994 Engines

Ford offered two engine options, the 3.8L V-6 engine and the 5.0L V-8 engine. Later in the year Ford released a new SVT Cobra, which had a 5.0L V-8 engine and 240 hp..... Learn more

1995 Engines

This was the last year Ford used the 5.0L V-8 in the Mustang. Ford started to incorporate the new modular 4.6L V8 engine. The V6 in the Mustang was the Essex V6 (3.8 liters).... Learn more

1996 Engines

Mustang GTs and Cobras welcomes the new modular 4.6L V8 for the first time (replacing the 5.0L V8). The Cobra got an DOHC aluminum V-8 and generated 305 hp... Learn more

1997 Engines

The two engine options for 1997 continued to be the 4.6L modular V8 as the optional engine. The standard engine was the 3.8 liter Essex V6 that was unchanged... Learn more

1998 Engines

The GT saw a power hike from its 4.6L V8 in 1998. Other than this change the rest of the powertrains were largely carryovers from the prior year... Learn more

1999 Engines

Both engines received great power upgrades. The 3.8L V-6 increased in horsepower to 190 hp, while the 4.6L DOHC V-8 was capable of producing 320 hp.... Learn more

2000 Engines

Ford released the SVT Mustang Cobra R with a 385 hp, 5.4L DOHC V-8 engine. It was also the first Mustang to ever feature a six-speed manual transmission... Learn more

2001 Engines

Ford continued with the two engine lineup in 2001, the Essex V6 taking on the base model assignment while the now popular 4.6 liter modular V8 was the option... Learn more

2002 Engines

Ford continued with the two engine lineup in 2002, the Essex V6 taking on the base model assignment while the now popular 4.6 liter modular V8 was the option... Learn more

2003 Engines

The Mach 1 returned to the lineup in 2003 with a cool ram-air “Shaker” hood scoop and a V8 with 305 hp. The SVT Cobra for that year got an Eaton supercharger for its 4.6L... Learn more

2004 Engines

No special editions this year meant Ford went back to its basic two engine lineup in 2004 with the Essex V6 and the 4.6 liter modular V8 powering all models... Learn more

Fifth generation (2005–2014)

5th Generation Ford Mustang Engine Options

5th Generation Ford Mustang Engine

Ford said goodbye to the 3.6L V-6 and replaced it with a 210-hp 4.0L SOHC V6 engine. The GT model featured a 300-hp 4.6L 3-valve V8 engine. We saw Ford bring back the 5.0 liter V8 and we also saw a great upgrade the V6 with a more powerful and efficient powertrain. The highlight of the fifth generation Mustang in terms of engines was definitely the Shelby GT500’s 5.8-liter V8, with its 662 horsepower and 631 lbs/ft of torque, making it the highest-horsepower engine to date.

2005 Engines

Ford said goodbye to the 3.6L V-6 and replaced it with a 210-hp 4.0L SOHC V6 engine (the Cologne V6). The GT model featured a 300-hp 4.6L 3-valve V8 engine.... Learn more

2006 Engines

Ford continued with the same engines in 2006, using the 4.0L the Cologne V6 and the 4.6L modular V8 for the GT models. The 300 hp 4.6L was a solid performer... Learn more

2007 Engines

2007 was a special year thanks to Shelby GT and GT500. The GT got a 4.6L V8 with 319 hp, while the GT500 got a 5.4L supercharged V8 and 500 hp. Learn more

2008 Engines

Ford brought back the Shelby GT and launched the Shelby GT500KR. The GT500KR got a 5.4L supercharged V-8 and Ford Racing Power Upgrade Pack... Learn more

2009 Engines

Ford brought back the Shelby GT and launched the Shelby GT500KR. The GT500KR got a 5.4L supercharged V-8 and Ford Racing Power Upgrade Pack... Learn more

2010 Engines

The 4.6L V8 GT produced 315 hp and 325 lbs.-ft of torque, thanks to incorporation of the "Bullitt" Package from 2008. The V6 engine remained the same... Learn more

2011 Engines

In 2011 we had the return of the 5.0L V8 engine (Coyote 5.0L) in the GT Model. The V6 was also revised with a new Duratec with more power and better fuel economy... Learn more

2012 Engines

The 2012 model was relatively unchanged.... Learn more

2013 Engines

Ford introduced a new Ford Shelby GT500 Mustang powered by an aluminum 5.8-liter supercharged V8 producing 662 horsepower and 631 lb.-ft. of torque... Learn more

2014 Engines

The 2014 Shelby GT500’s 5.8-liter V8 aluminum-block engine produced 662 horsepower and 631 lbs.-ft. of torque, making it the highest-horsepower engine to date... Learn more

Sixth generation (2015–Present)

6th Generation Ford Mustang Engine Options

6th Generation Ford Mustang Engine

The sixth generation Mustang engine lineup is certainly interesting. In 2015 we saw the Mustang add the EcoBoost 2.3L to the line up. This turbocharged four-cylinder engine features a dual overhead cam (DOHC) design, in an inline configuration and is turbocharged. It took over altogether from the V6 in 2018 as the base car motor. At the top end of the spectrum the sixth generation Mustang also saw an epic engine called the "Predator", a hand built 5.2-liter, supercharged V8 engine with an absurd 760 hp and 625 lb/ft of torque. 

2015 Engines

Three engines were available for the first year. First up was the trusty 3.7L Duratec V6 in the base car. A new EcoBoost 4 was also available as was the Coyote 5.0L V8... Learn more

2016 Engines

A forth engine was made available in the Mustang lineup in 2016 thanks to the introduction of the Shelby GT350 and Shelby GT350R. "Voodoo" had 526 hp and 429 lb/ft... Learn more

2017 Engines

The four engine lineup continued in 2017. Once again the Shelby's "Voodoo" supercharged V8 tops the lot with its 526 hp and 429 lb/ft of torque. A beast of an engine... Learn more

2018 Engines

The biggest engine change for the Mustang in 2018 was the discontinuation of the V6 as the base car engine, being replaced by the very solid 2.3L EcoBoost I4... Learn more

2019 Engines

No big changes in the Mustang engine department for 2019. The same three engines from 2018 continued to power the lineup. A strong three for sure with credible... Learn more

2020 Engines

2020 was the year of the Predator. The Predator is a 5.2-liter, supercharged V8 engine. Hand-built and specifically designed for the Shelby GT500 it is top chops.. Learn more

2021 Engines

No big changes in the Mustang engine department for 2021. The same three engines from 2020 continued to power the lineup. Look for the Mach-E separately... Learn more

First generation (2020–Present)

Ford Mustang Mach-E Powertrain Options

1st Generation Ford Mustang Mach-E Motors

Here comes electrification....

2021 Motors

The next generation of Ford will be powered by electricity. The Mach-E arrives in 2021 and its powertrain is state of the art.... Learn more
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